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Our Mission

Dedicated to the conservation, maintenance, improvement and development and use of land, soil, water, trees, vegetation, fish and wildlife and other natural resources in Vermont, since 1983.

SEE WHAT THE DISTRICTS

HAVE TO OFFER

NRCDS ARE FOR EVERYONE!
Natural Resource Conservation Districts (NRCDs) are non-regulatory entities that work with private landowners, farms, state and federal agencies, and other partner organizations to promote and implement conservation programs.

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NRCS – Soil Conservation 

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) presents a documentary on soil conservation pioneer Hugh Hammond Bennett, the history of our agency and the birth of the private lands conservation movement in the U.S.

Find Your Local Conservation District

Click on the map to learn more about your local conservation district!

 

Widham County

Bennigton County

Ottauquechee

White River

Rutland

POULTNEY-METTOWEE

Otter Creek

Winooski

Lamoille

Caledonia

Franklin

Orleans

Essex

Grand Isle

 

About the Vermont Association of Conservation Districts (VACD)

The Vermont Association of Conservation Districts (VACD) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization established in 1983 formed to conduct educational, scientific, charitable work concerning conservation, maintenance, improvement and development and use of land, soil, water, trees, vegetation, fish and wildlife and other natural resources in Vermont. READ MORE…

  

What We Do

The Vermont Association of Conservation Districts (VACD) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization established in 1983 formed to conduct educational, scientific, charitable work concerning conservation, maintenance, improvement and development and use of land, soil, water, trees, vegetation, fish and wildlife and other natural resources in Vermont.

The voting members of the association are the 14 Natural Resource Conservation Districts (NRCDs) in the State of Vermont.  Conservation Districts were established in 1939 as under the Soil and Conservation Act # 246.  Please see the Conservation Districts page of this website for a complete listing of Districts and more information their programs.

April 10th, 1pm-4pm

No-Till Workshop: It’s more than the planter, but the planter is a good place to start! Sign up before April 3rd for this FREE workshop.

Contact Nanci McGuire to register: nanci.mcguire@vt.nacdnet.net

April 10th, 6pm-8pm

Pasture & Manure Management for Horses Workshop. Sign up before April 3rd for this FREE workshop.

Contact Nanci McGuire to register: nanci.mcguire@vt.nacdnet.net

Conservation Needs *You*

The holidays are over, but one song is still playing through my head: All I want for Christmas is you. Because your participation – above and beyond what you’re already doing – is what we most want here at the Conservation District. Probably you are already doing something to steward our natural resources – maybe you …

Buttonbush for Butterflies and Awesome Aronia

Buttonbush has one of the most unique flowers of any shrub, and butterflies think so too. Aronia’s blueberry-sized black fruits have the highest known levels of antioxidants (anthocyanins and flavonoids) of any temperate fruit, five times higher than cranberry and blueberry, and contain strong anticancer compounds. Both are Vermont natives with wildlife benefits that have earned them spots as our featured discounted shrubs this spring.

Tile Drainage: Good or Bad?

Tile drainage can have many benefits. By more quickly draining extra water from a field, the field can be accessed sooner for planting, crop roots can grow farther down, compaction is reduced, and soil moisture is more often optimal for crop growth. These soil health improvements are key for maintaining productivity in the face of more frequent, intense precipitation and droughts we’ve …

Young Farmers Converge in D.C.

Our District Manager and Fairfield farmer Damien Boomhower were among three Vermonters who traveled to Washington D.C. in November to join young farmers from across the country for the annual Young Farmers Coalition convergence.

Roadside signs highlight farmers’ leadership on water quality

More than 7,000 acres of corn fields were planted with a cover crop in Franklin County last fall, and thousands more acres received other conservation practices such as no-till planting and conversion to grass crops. In fact, according to a new scorecard by the Union of Concerned Scientists, Vermont ranks first in the nation for use of conservation practices. New roadside signs will help highlight this work that can otherwise be very hard to see.

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